Friday, 19 September 2014

Reflecting on Reflection

Reflecting on Reflection

Having students reflecting on their learning and reflect on their thinking was really brought to my attention several years ago when I attended a "Tribes" workshop.  That workshop was several years ago now and I still can remember the activities and the learning that happened that day.  

Why do I remember? I remember because we reflected on our learning! Reflection is not only powerful for student learning but for my own learning as well as an educator.

Reflecting on Reflection strategies

1. I have used exit cards/tickets

The exit cards have been on sticky notes, q-cards, slips of paper, in their journals, on chart paper, on the chalk board(yes I said chalk) etc.

The medium I find doesn't matter. It gives the students a chance to answer a question about the lesson. It is a quick way for them to think about what they have learned or show their learning.

This is an example out of my interactive notebook.

2. What stuck with you today?

The second is actually kind of an exit card. This occur at the end of the day. I had seen it via Pinterest and created a "what stuck with you today" on my door.  After filling in our agendas/devices we took a sticky note and filled it out.  It helped the students reflect over their entire day and not just the lesson.

This is not mine but I found the example here. This one is so much cuter:)

3. I have used reflection circles:

I really like this strategy as students have the questions ahead of time. They have the chance to think about what they are going to say prior to actually completing the activity. It holds students accountable for their reflections as they know they will be sharing. I have also found that most students actually want to share what they have learned. It eliminates the pressure of sharing in front of the whole class. 

Here is a video of reflection circles in action:

What have you used in your classroom to help students reflect on their learning?


  1. These are all wonderful ideas! I've used many of these same ones too. After attending ECOO last year and having a discussion with some other attendees on the way home, I also used an idea shared there (by Scott Kemp, I think). I had students write a letter or an email each week to their parents reflecting on their learning throughout the week and setting goals. This was a great way to keep parents informed of what was happening in the classroom, and allow them to support this learning at home. I've also recorded podcasts or videos with reflections. This is a nice full class option, especially with younger learners that may find it harder to write. I'd be curious to hear what others have to say about this.


  2. Reflection is most important in order for students to learn. The main important part is to share what they have reflected on and what they have learnt and questions they still have. This gives students the opportunity to also learn from each others too.To make students accountable they have to share their reflections. We need to allow students to reflect on experiences for ownership and accountability. I like the poster what stuck with you.


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